processed foods

Related to my quandary over artificial versus natural foods, I’ve been trying to eat fewer processed foods–specifically vending machine junk! The problem is, I buy fruit and yogurt and it sits in the fridge–sometimes it just doesn’t cut it.  So then I had the bright idea of buying “healthier” snack food to keep at the office.  But…I ate the whole box in one sitting!  Individually wrapped things don’t seem to deter me from scarfing them down.  So, any ideas on what to do?

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exercising more but still eating like crazy

I’ve been exercising more, but I’m also breastfeeding and pumping less, and I’m still binging.  So I’m back up to my heaviest weight post-baby #2, and only 0.4 pounds less than post-baby #1. 😦   I’m now 1 pound heavier than when I came back to Weight Watchers in December 2013, post-baby #2.

I really do beat myself up inside.  I feel like such a failure.  Though the WW receptionist today was really sweet and helpful.  She reminded me that it happens, I’m thinking about it, trying something new, coming to meetings, and getting support.  Who knows, maybe if I hadn’t been going to meetings since December I would have gained 10 pounds instead of one…

I think what I really need is to find ways to soothe myself without food.  I need to find other things to enjoy.  And to remember that nothing tastes as good as thin feels.  I think I also need to drink more water.  I’m so thirsty all the time.

I’ve been thinking about doing Simply Filling for a few days to kind of reset my mind and hopefully decrease my sweet tooth a bit.  It’s been months since I first thought of it, but I think I’m actually going to do it.

I’m going to try to decrease the negative self-talk and turn it into positive challenges.  Here are some examples from the Mayo Clinic:


 

  • Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you.

Here are some examples of negative self-talk and how you can apply a positive thinking twist to them:

Putting positive thinking into practice

Negative self-talk Positive thinking
I’ve never done it before. It’s an opportunity to learn something new.
It’s too complicated. I’ll tackle it from a different angle.
I don’t have the resources. Necessity is the mother of invention.
I’m too lazy to get this done. I wasn’t able to fit it into my schedule, but I can re-examine some priorities.
There’s no way it will work. I can try to make it work.
It’s too radical a change. Let’s take a chance.
No one bothers to communicate with me. I’ll see if I can open the channels of communication.
I’m not going to get any better at this. I’ll give it another try.

 

I’ve been depressed that I didn’t meet my 5% goal by my youngest’s first birthday.  So I’m going to set new goals:

  • Lose 5% by Halloween.
  • Lose 10% by New Year’s.
  • Get to my goal weight (-20 pounds) by my birthday (March 1, 2015)

I’ll give it another try!!!